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Blog Archive

Tales of the Timber

  • The Endicott Pear Tree

    The Endicott Pear Tree

    Planted between the years 1632 and 1649, and declared a National Monument of The United States in 2011. That’s right. The Endicott Pear Tree has held its roots now for close to 400 years! What rich history must be grown into its bark? What stories could this tree tell us?

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  • A Look Into the Past

    A Look Into the Past

    On Groundhog Day, Punxsutawney Phil may be able to help us see 6 weeks into the climate’s future, but trees can help us see centuries and even millenniums into its past.

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  • Where Our Reclaimed Wood Comes From

    Where Our Reclaimed Wood Comes From

    Reclaimed wood has a longer and more interesting story than most other wood products. Because of this, customers frequently ask us, “Where does your reclaimed wood come from?” This is a difficult question to answer, though, as each piece of Reclaimed Antique wood is unique and its origin varies.

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  • Old Hickory

    Old Hickory

    Few men were as sturdy as “Old Hickory” Andrew Jackson. The 7th President of the United States was very passionate about dueling his opponents to defend his honor. His famous duel against Charles Dickinson in 1806 was the perfect example of his vigor. Jackon knew the duel would be more of a battle of wits because Dickinson was an excellent marksman. Jackson developed a strong strategy for the duel, one that ended up proving fatal.

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  • The Story Behind Antique Factory Plank

    The Story Behind Antique Factory Plank

    As the nation moved from an agricultural focus to an industrial focus in the 19th century, the country gained lots of manufacturing power. Mills and factories were rapidly built to keep up with society’s demands - and each needed a floor. Finding a flooring material that was readily available and sturdy enough to handle the daily foot-traffic of a factory proved to be a challenge.

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  • The Hundred Horse Chestnut

    The Hundred Horse Chestnut

    In Sicily, Italy there lives a tree called the Hundred Horse Chestnut. According to local legend, the tree was named after it provided shelter for the Queen of Naples and 100 of her knights during a thunderstorm a few hundred years ago. As you can imagine, in order to shelter that many people, the tree is quite large. But the tree’s size isn’t its only impressive characteristic.

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  • Olde Wood

    Olde Wood "Unlimited" Web Series - Intro to Wide Plank Flooring and Reclaimed Woods

    Take a look the first video in our new web series, Olde Wood Unlimited! Through this web series, we want to give you an inside look at our company and how we provide our customers with the best wide plank flooring and reclaimed wood building materials. Learn about the characteristics of our engineered flooring in our first video, and what qualities make it a lifetime floor. Stay tuned in the next few weeks to learn more about our company, products, and processes!

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  • What's in a Name?

    What's in a Name?

    The Douglas Fir tree has many claims to fame such as it is a frequent world traveler and it was used to provide the structural backbone of many of America’s industrial buildings. But perhaps one of the most interesting things about the tree is how it was named…

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  • Resurrecting the American Chestnut

    Resurrecting the American Chestnut

    After an Asian tree fungus wiped out the American Chestnut tree in the early 1900s, large efforts have been made to bring the tree back. Blight resistant strands of Chestnut may soon be a reality, thanks to some genetic engineering. For now, though, American Chestnut hardwood can only be found by reclaiming agricultural and industrial structures.

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  • D. Boone Kilt a Bar

    D. Boone Kilt a Bar

    The American Beech Tree is highly coveted for its rock-hard timber which can be turned into beautiful reclaimed hardwood flooring. But sometimes in the forests it is used as a canvas by summer lovers who wish to memorialize their connection by carving their initials in its bark. This isn’t a new tradition, however, as hunters in the pioneer days often commemorated their hunts using the same method. Supposedly even Daniel Boone partook in the custom.

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